Creating a Kaizen Culture

Presented By:

Mike Wroblewski

Session Abstract:

Transforming a culture is far more about emotional growth than technical maturity. Co-written by leaders at the Kaizen Institute, Creating a Kaizen Culture explains how to enable an adaptive, excellent, and sustainable organization by leveraging core kaizen values and the behaviors they generate.

This presentation will highlight portions of the book on:

WHAT KAIZEN CULTURE IS AND WHY WE NEED IT

HOW EVERYONE, EVERYWHERE CAN PRACTICE KAIZEN EVERY DAY

THE LEADER’S ROLE IN TURNING KAIZEN CULTURE INTO COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

 

Learning Objectives:

“In this session you will learn…”

  • Creating a Kaizen Culture will help bring awareness to the impact of culture on organizations path of continuous improvement.
  • Leaders will better understand culture on a deeper level, more importantly a kaizen culture and how their daily behaviors and thinking impact their culture.
  • Our intent is that lean leaders will improve their leadership skills to personally grow their own knowledge and improve daily behaviors focused on daily kaizen and developing others as a central theme to their daily management system.

About the Facilitator:

Mike Wroblewski, Director for Kaizen Institute and Shingo Award winning co-author of “Creating a Kaizen Culture”, has over 27 years of manufacturing management experience, strong technical skills and a passion for teaching Kaizen, Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma.

During his career, Mike has held various management and leadership positions including Industrial Engineer, Manufacturing Engineer, Manufacturing Manager, Manager of Quality and Continuous Improvement, Director of Operations and Lean Sensei. Mike’s journey into Lean manufacturing began in the 1985 while working for the Hill-Rom Company. Under the watchful eye of Shigeo Shingo, Mike successfully improved a die changeover from 45 minutes to less then 5 minutes. Mike learned first hand from the master, Shigeo Shingo, the techniques of the SMED system along with the early teachings of eliminating waste from manufacturing operations.